Translation: Again on that Roadway | Ahmad Faraz

 

Phir Usi Rehguzar Par Shaayad – By Ahmad Faraz

Translation: Again on that Roadway – By Aashish Vaidya

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(1)

फिर उसी रहगुज़ार पर शायद

हम कभी मिल सकें मगर शायद

Phir usi rehguzar par shaayad

hum kabhi mil sakein, magar shaayad

Again on that roadway, maybe

We’ll bump into each other, maybe.

 

(2)

जान-पहचान से भी क्या होगा

फिर भी ऐ दोस्त ग़ौर कर शायद

Jaan pehchaan se bhi kya hoga

phir bhi ai dost ghaur (गौर) kar, shaayad

When is mere acquaintance enough?

But friend, be keen, just in case.

 

(3)

जिन के हम मुंतज़िर रहे उन को

मिल गए और हम-सफ़र शायद

Jinke hum Muntazir rahe unko

mil gaye aur hum-safar shaayad

For whom I was waiting all along

They’ve found another fellow traveller, maybe.

 

(4)

अज्नबिय्यत की धुँद छट जाए

चमक उठ्ठे तिरी नज़र शायद

Ajnabiyat kii dhund chat jaa.e

Chamak uthe tirii nazar shaayad

Hope the fog of unfamiliarity lifts,

Is that a glint of recognition in your eyes, maybe?

 

(5)

ज़िंदगी भर लहू रुलाएगी

याद-ए-यारान-ए-बे-ख़बर शायद

Zindagi bhar lahuu rulaaegii

Yaad-e-yaaran-e-bekhabar shaayad

Am I doomed to shed tears of blood

Due to forgetfulness of friends? Maybe.

 

(6)

जो भी बिछड़े वो कब मिले हैं ‘फ़राज़’

फिर भी तू इंतिज़ार कर शायद

Jo bhi bichhde hain cab mile hain “Faraz”

phir bhi tu intizaar kar shaayad

Separated friends ’Faraz’ don’t ever meet

Even then, hope that they do, maybe.

 

Notes: This simple ghazal by Ahmad Faraz, interestingly turned out fairly difficult to translate.  Since the translation had to maintain or convey the same sort of simplicity in phrasing, while catching the nuances as well.  As usual ghazal translations are hard to translate the rhyme (qafiyah).  So, I only maintained the refrain (radiff).

This ghazal was rendered very melancholically by Jagjit Singh.

Phir ussi rehguzar – Jagjit Singh

And here is another version by Ghulam Ali.

Phir ussi rehguzar – Ghulam Ali

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Same Story, Different Times

Day 19 of NaPoWriMo.  Today’s form is to write a landay.  Landays are “22-syllable couplets, generally rhyming. The form comes from Afghanistan, where women often use it in verses that range from the sly and humorous to the deeply sardonic and melancholy.”  The first line is 9 and second line is 13 syllable. The couplets usually rhyme.  There is a long form piece written by Eliza Griswold in Poetry magazine that is a fascinating look at the history of landays.  Landays are usually orally shared and rarely written down.  They are way for Afghani women to express themselves and provide voice to their condition.

I pieced together a 6 landays into a poem as the prompt suggest into something resembling a syllabic ghazal.

Serenading with the help of band,
accept my hand, together we stand on shifting sand.

No need for cloak and dagger routine
We stand in chaos as an oasis of serene.

Definition of heaven and hell:
Joy of brief rendezvous with you, tonight, in a cell.

Bidding you goodbye with tears to spare
I'm saving some for later if my eyes are laid bare.

Please allow me a glimpse of your sight,
sparkles of immortality in death might ignite.

From caravan I’ll be bereft, 
Feel me in every drop of rain, in every petal’s theft.